MOVEMENTS No. 1 & 2

It’s fantastic because what Babelle Theatre chooses not to do is exactly what makes it so compelling. It encourages you to give up what you take for granted about theatre, so that you may actually experience it.
— By Dale MacDonald, Daily Hive

Full review here

And that’s why it was a pleasure to see this show on a warm summer evening. [...] And there is so much talent on this team—writer, director, designers, actors—that it was pouring out of the found performance space on East Georgia and flowing down the street.
— Colin Thomas' blog

Full review here

Unlike Ionensco’s play where the payoff comes in discovering the leader has no head, the payoff in Movements 1&2 is violence, that is tempered as each character (or was it actor?) taking care of the other’s wounds. Perhaps it is a a suggestion that from the ruins of one movement can come another.
— By Mark Robins, Vancouver Presents
Babelle Theatre [...] is without a doubt one of this year’s hot topic theatre companies to keep your eye on.
— By Zoë Forsyth, Artslandia Vancouver

Full review here

But overall, the night was more than worth the price of admission and wrapped in just over an hour. The haunting image of the fisherman going about his grisly work in a warped new world of commerce – that moment transcended the night, and proves that the best ideas can come in spare packaging.
— By Cecilia Lu, Vancity Buzz

Full review here

Shorts can be a risky endeavour as there is little time to fully develop characters and plot, but there is a somber reality to each of the three presented as part of Rivulets. As Vancouver continues through one of its driest summers on record, that irony is not lost.
— By Mark Robins, Vancouver Presents

Full review here


THE 4TH GRADERS PRESENT AN UNNAMED LOVE-SUICIDE

 I liked this play. It was ballsy, with purposely long monologues that commit more to the concept of being written by a fourth grader than to entertaining the audience. Sometimes that style gets in the way of substance but there were some truly heart stabbing-moments played well, in particular by Conor Wylie. The rest of the cast was great too, including Emilie Leclerc as the cool girl’s best friend who is more than a little off kilter (a good archetype that isn’t used enough). The final drop of blood from the bucket tied to the roof was a perfectly executed punctuation mark. Like Nickelodeon slime.
— By Mack Gordon, 2014 Year in Review - The Plays I Saw

Full review here


But then “Postscript” by The Noisy Neighbours offers a piece of silent mail-based physical theatre that is as clever as it is charming; reminiscent of the great French film Amelie, “Postscript” is worth the extra ride.
— By John Threlfall, CVV Magazine

Full review of Theatre SKAM's Bike Ride here